Rnnk . R

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Magazine of tKe Hour

VOL. 1.

MAY, 1922.

NUMBER 1

. . IN THIS NUMBER . .

How to Make a Home Radio Set for $6.

An Official U, S. Government Article For Boys.

Chicago Boy's Simple Directions for Making Radiophone at Home.

Fully and Clearly Illustrated.

Questions and Answers.

They Simplify Your Own Radio Problems.

How to Get a Good Radio Set—- Free.

A MAGAZINE FOR A MILLION FANS

For Beginners, Experts, Dealers, Jobbers, Manufacturers

$2.50 a Year

25c a Coiay

Radio Age

f

\\

PROSPECTUS

UR special field : The Middle West and the West. This includes the "Chicago Territory" Avhich is unquestionably the richest agricultural, com- mercial, financial and industrial region in the world. Radiophones accord- ing to late figures published through the Associated Press, are being used in four States as follows : Iowa, 23,000 ; Missouri, 25,000; Nebraska, 22,000; Kansas, 20,000; Wisconsin, 1,500 stations, increasing at the rate of 5 a day. Cleveland alone has 15,000 amateur and professional radio enthusiasts; St. Louis, 2,200; Dallas, 263; Cincinnati, 500; Indianapolis, 1,000; ]Milwaukee, 1,000. Schools and colleges in all states are teaching radio, farmers all over the INIiddle West are installing radio sets; clubs are being organized everywhere.

Chicago Radio operatives are growing in number so rapidly that their number could only be approximateh^ estimated. Thousands of boys are studying practical radio science in the public schools. Dealers and manufacturers are unable to supply tlie demand for equipment.

Our special circulation: Boy begimiers particularly, and amateurs generally. Radio Age will write Radio so that boys can understand it. There will be technical ai'ticles for the advanced students of Radio but the departments for beginners will not be written OVER THE READERS' HEADS. Numerous illustrations will aid amateurs in constructing HOME RADIO SETS. Getting a printed message across is simply one form of SALESMANSHIP and, it is a highly specialized line. Radio Age knows its market and knows how to supply it.

Our sj^ecial departments: In addition to illustrated articles showing begin- ners how to launch out into the ether waves there will be original articles written by boj^s telling what they have done in Radio and how. There will be a Questions And Answers department, carefully handled; Radio Clubs will have attention with liberal use of names of individuals and photographs ; there will be a department for Trade News, a Radio Readers' Exchange, for letters of interest from our readers. These features will be supplemented by articles presenting facts about the growth of radio in popularity, about the constantly increasing list of practical uses for radio, about the importance of radio in its relation to society generally. Radio Age will have no narrowed view of its subject.

It is the hour of Radio. We offer

"The Magazine of the Hour"

Radio Ace, The Magazine of the Hour, piililihhed on April 8; a montlily maRrazine. Vol. I, No. 1. Publication ofHee, Garrick Building, 64 \V. Kandolpl) St., Chicago, 111. Soibscription price $2.50' a year. Published bv the M. B. Smith Publishing Co. Kntry as second class matter applied for at the postofflce at Chicago, niinois, under the ACT of March 3, 1879.

(1.) 8ergt. Lawrence W. Bock no longer has "the lonesom.est job in the army." He is the operator of the army radio station at Fort McPherson, Ga. The picture shows him enjoying songs by Galli Curd broadcast from Atlanta, Ga. (2.) Edward Herron, Chicago boy, showing one he made himself. Edward is proud of it and has a right to be. (3.) Chicago Boys' Club No. 2, 1725 Orchard St., has a radio class. Left to right, George Hensel, Charles Coleman, Jr.. Erwin Alanap and William Pour. (4.) Elizabeth A. Bergner, radio instructor at Lane Techni-

cal Hioh School pTrtlni

in hpr rln

Mm

EADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR"

Who's Who In Radio

"Paddy" O'Neill

/F WE were to fol- low a time-hon- ored custom we zvould devote this page to men who are great and famous. Edison, Fleming, Marconi and De For- est, to he sure. All honor to these celeb- rities.

But the age of radio is essentially a '<ncw era for boys and the boys of today may be Steinmctzes tomor- row.

So our first Who's Who presents "Pad- dy" O'Neill and Eddie Neils en. See Eddie's own story beginning on Page 5 and read about Paddy on this page. Send in your favorite boy radio "experts" for our Who's Who page.

^^^-^

Edzuin Nielsen

/~\NE of the most enthusiastic boy ^-^ radio fans in the Middle "West is "Paddy" O'Neill, 11-year-old son of Detective Patrick J. O'Neill, who was killed by Tommy O'Connor, the Chi- cago gunman.

Little Pat, now the "man of the fami- ly," owns a cheap receiving set, which he has rigged himself, driving a pipe into the ground in his back yard to ground the wires. Driving in the pipe took a whole day of the boy's time.

As soon as his set was rigged and in operation, Pat called in all the neigh-

bors to hear the Chicago Opera Com- pany, hearing the same music as though he and his friends were in the front row at the Auditoi'ium Theater at $6 a seat.

The concerts are now a nightly fea- ture in the O'Neill home. Detective O'Neill was killed when he and six other detectives went to the home of William Foley, O'Connor's brother-in law, to arrest him for the forfeiture of bonds in a charge of robbery. O'Con- nor dashed from the house, firing as he

ran. O'Neill fell, dying on the way to the hospital.

Little Pat immediately took command of the family his mother and three small brothers and sisters acting for the grief-stricken woman in helping comrades of the slain policeman ar- range a fitting funeral.

Through the generosity of Chicago citizens more than $10,000 was raised fo;* the bereaved family.

Pat also wired their little home, and once tapped the service wires of the but that's a secret.

II 1 1 111 Ml II 1 1 1 II I III! I M II 1 1 HI I M 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 1 1 II I \M 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 II I u 1 1 n I II I u 1 1 '■ 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 nil 1 1 1 1 1 n II I Mil I m \xn:

S^

FMD/O MGE

4- Tfte Ma^a^ine oe Ifte Hour ^ ^^^^^.>™^ ^.„^*

M,B. SMITH ^ €f y ' -^ FREBERIiliirilllll:

PUBLISHED -M.ONTH1.Y GARRiCK. BL.DG CtiGO.

PUBLISHE^Rj

EDlpepiiiiiiiiiiillii

Hill Mill II in I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I [ II u I I I I I 1 I n u I 1 I I I 1 I I 11 I u 1 I II I III II I I I I I II n I II I I M I I I I M I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I M I I I 1 I I I I 1 1 I I I iir

Great Radio Shows To Come

THE Radio show at the Hotel Penn- sylvania in New York set that city radio wild and greatly increased the interest in other shows to be given in the larger cities. Pittsburgh and Bos- ton come first and then Chicago is to have two expositions, one in the Leiter Building, from June 26 to July 1, in- clusive, and the other in the Coliseum during the week of October 15 to 21.

How you can send your morning kiss by radio to your wife while speeding over the rails on fast trains, how you can enjoy the great concerts of the country, listen in on vaudeville per- formances and hear the world news while seated comfortably in your home will be visualized by the displays at the National Radio Exposition to be held in the Leiter Building, Chicago, June 26th to July 1st, inclusive. Radio fans will be enabled to see every type of apparatus in operation at this show, Avhere accessories by the gross will be exhibited and where numerous "stunts" will be put on to be broad- cast throughout the middle west. This announcement was made by Milo E. Westbrooke, well known exposition manager, who recently staged the National Shoe Exposition in Chicago and who has put on some of the big- gest trade shows in New York and Chicago. Mr. Westbrooke declared the Chicago Radio Exposition would be bigger and better than the one recently held in New York, Avhere thousands upon thousands were turned away every night.

"This probably will be the most comprehensive Radio exposition ever conducted by, for and in the interest of radio fans," said Mr. Westbrooke. "There will be exhibits of every sort of radio apparatus manufactured, in- cluding the very latest devices and in- ventions. All the parts that are used in the construction of sending and re- ceiving instruments will be on display.

"The working of the radiophone will be demonstrated and the people who have listened to concerts given hun- dreds of miles away and heard the world news transmitted to them while seated comfortably in their homes, will have an opportunity to see the instru- ments in operation and view the vari- ous parts utilized in their construction.

lir> !~>]io\^r in .Tnre will bp orip nf

the greatest educational expositions

ever held in Chicago or any other city.

"The sudden popularity of radio tele-

The Sweet devot( >■ of Radio carries a net in her hand bag.

phony has resulted in the establishment of more than 600,000 receiving sets in the country, and of these 150,000 are located in the middle west. Through- out the United States 20,000 amateurs are qualified as transmitters, capable of sending and receiving a minimum of fifty characters a minute by trans- continental Morse code. For each Radiophone there is an average audi- ence of five persons, thus making a total of 2,500,000 who are associated with the wonders of wireless."

The October Show

U. J. Herrmann, of the Cort Theater, announces that the "Annual Chicago Radio Show" will be given each year in October because deferring the exhi- bition to that season will give the manu- facturers a chance to catch up with de- liveries and will also permit them to complete and perfect many improve- ments in construction and design.

Mr. Herrmann says:

"Because of the enormous demand most manufacturers of radio equipment

October conditions should be greatl; improved. The radio shows which havu been held in other cities during the las^ year have been pronounced successes In New York the public was turner away by the thousands every day dur ing the show in the Pennsylvania hote and the crowds were so great arounc the exhibits as to cause actual discom fort.

"The nation-Avide, ever-growing in terest in radio has amply demonstratec that only the largest exhibition build ings are adequate to properly handh the enormous crowds whose enthusiasn has placed radio shows on the plam with the big national automobile ex hibits. ' '

The Pittsburgh Show Rare harmony from Chicago, musica comedy from Cleveland, trade condi tions information from St. Louis, new flashes from New York, government re ports from the National Capitol, thesi are only a few of the many feature given via radio at the first Pittsburgl radio exhibition in the William Peni hotel, April 11, 12 and 13. A larg^ receiving set erected by the Westing house interests receives and transmit these messages from the air for th benefit of the Pittsburgh fans and th numerous visiting delegations from th neighboring districts and states.

Practically every one of the larges manufacturers of radio equipment ani supplies made reservation for the sho'w but as space it limited at the Williai Penn a few could not be accommodatec Leading local dealers and distributor have extensive displays and thei booths are both beautiful and educ? tional. There are on exhibition set of every one of the leading radio mam facturers as well as a large percentag of the battery and accessory people.

The educational talks and iUustrf ted lectures are held throughout th afternoon and evening of each day c the show, except the opening date whe the doors are open at 7 o'clock. Thes lectures are conducted by men prom nent in the industry and are intende to both instruct the fans as to tl: proper means of assembling their equi] ment and to educate the uninitiated it to the mysteries of the wireless.

KADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR"

Tune Up and Listen In

roadcasting from these Stations is on 360 meters zvhere not otherwise specified

Midwest Broadcasts

Eiglitli District

,J)KA Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Daily, except Sunday, music 10:00-10:15 a. m. and 12:30-1:00, 2:00-2:20 and 4:00-4:20 p. m., with special Saturday concert 3:00-4:00 p. m.; bedtime stories, 7:30 p. m.; press, 7:45; special features and vaudeville acts, 8:00 p. m.; music and news, 8:30-9:30; Sunday, church service, 10:45 a. m., 3:00 p. m. and 7:30 p. m.

|VBL— The Detroit News, 615 Lafayette Bldg., Detroit, Mich. Daily, except Sun- day, 11:30-11:55 a. m., and 3:30-4:00 p. m., phonograph music; 7:00-8:30 p. m., spec- ial musical programs by selected artists.

iQV— Doubleday-Hill Electric Co., 719 Lib- erty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. Daily except Saturday and Sunday, music, 4:30-5:00 p. m.; Sunday, 1:00-1:30 p. m. and 4:00 to 5 p. m. ; Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9:30 to 10:30 p. ra.

I VDZ— Marshall Gerken Ave., Toledo, Ohio.

Co., 27 Ontario

I VPB Pittsburgh Gazette-Times, Gazette Square, Pittsburgh, Pa.

•VMH Precision Equipment Co., Cincin- nati, Ohio. Monday, Wednesday and Sat- urday, 8:15-10:00 p. m., music, speeches and news; dally 485 meters; 11:00 a. m. and 4:00 p. m., weather reports.

Ninth District

hVOV— R. B. Howell, 1802 Farnum St.. Omaha, Neb.

|tVHA University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. Daily except Sunday, weather re- ports at 12:35 p. m., Friday at 8:15 p. m.; special music and other dates as an- nounced. Midnight to 1:00 a. m., univer- sity news on 410 meters.

I rtLB University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 485 meters; daily 12 noon, weather and stock reports; 7:30 p. m., wheat and potato market; 7:45 p. m. Wednesday only, music, 360 meters.

I iVLK— Hamilton Mfg. Co., 2011 North Ala- bama St., Indianapolis, Ind., Sunday, 8:00-8:55, religious, vocal and instru- mental music; Tuesday, 8:00-8:55 p. m., jazz, vocal and instrumental music; 9:00- 10:00 p. m., local theatre numbers and news items; Thursday, 8:00-8:55, special numbers from local singers and orches- tras, stories, news and speeches.

|aYW Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., Ill W. Washington St., Chicago, 111. Daily, except Sunday, 9:30, 10:00, 10:30, 11:30, and 12:00 a. m. and 2:45 p. m., stock and market reports; 2:15, 4:15 and 6:00 p. m., news and market reports; 7:00 p. m., summary of financial report; 7:30 p. m., children's bedtime story; 8:00-9:00 p. m., musical program; 9:00 p. m., news and sports; Sunday, 3:30 p. m.. Radio Chapel.

|tXAB Western Radio Co., Kansas City, Mo. Market reports and weather fore- cast, 11:30 a. m. and 2:30 p. m.; concerts in the evening.

|>ZAF Reynolds Radio Co., Denver, Colo. Xews twice daily and concert Sunday

List of stations broadcasting niarlict or weather reports (485 meters) and music, concerts,

lectures, etc. {360 meters), {March 10, 1922).

T, ^ Owner of station. Location of Station

Allen. Preston D Oakland, Calif

American Radio & Research Corp Medford Hillside, Mass.

Atlantic-Pacific Radio Supplies Co Oakland, Calif

Bamberger, L.., & Co. . Newark, N. J

Bible Institute of Los Angeles, Inc Los Angeles, Calif. ...

Church of the Covenant Washington, D. C

City of Chicago Chicago, 111

Cox, Warren R Cleveland, Ohio

Crosley Mfg. Co Cincinnati, Ohio

DePorest Radio Telep. & Teleg. Co New York NY...

Detroit News, The Detroit, Mich

Doubleday-Hill Electric Co Pittsburgh, Pa. . . .

Doron Brothers Electric Co Hamilton, Ohio '.

Duck Co., Wm. B Toledo, Ohio

Dunn & Co., J. J Pasadena, Calif

Electric Lighting & Supply Co Hollywood, Calif

Examiner Printing Co., The San Francisco. Calif. . .

General Electric Co Schenectady. N. Y

Gilbert Co., A. C New Haven. Conn

Gould, C. O Stockton, Calif

Hamilton Mfg. Co Indianapolis, Ind

Hatfield Electric Co •. Indianapolis, Ind

Herrold, Chas. D San Jose, Calif

Hobrecht, J. C Sacramento, Calif

Howlett, Thos. F. J Philadelphia, Pa'.

Karlowa Radio Co Rock Island, 111

Kennedy, Colin B. Co Los Altos, Calif

Kluge. Arno A Los Angeles, Calif. . . .

Kraft, Vincent I Seattle, Wash

Lorden. Edwin L San Francisco, Calif. . .

Marshall-Gerken Co Toledo, Ohio

Metropolitan Utilities District Omaha, Nebr

Meyberg Co., Leo J San Francisco, Calif. . .

Meyberg Co.. Leo J Los Angeles, Calif. . . .

Missouri State Marketing Bureau .lefferson City, Mo

Montgomery Light & Water Power Co Montgomery, Ala

New.spaper Printing Co Pittsburgh, Pa

Northern Radio & Electric Co Seattle, Wash

Palladium Printing Co Richmond, Ind

Pine Bluff Co., The Pine Bluff, Ark

Pomona Fixture & Wiring Co Pomona, Calif

Portable Wireless Telephone Co Stockton. Calif

Precision Equipment Co Cincinnati, Ohio

Precision Shop, The Gridley, Calif

Radio Construction & Electric Co Washington, D. C

Radio Corporation of America Roselle Park, N. J. ...

Radio Shop, The Sunnyvale, Calif

Radio Telephone Shop, The San Francisco, Calif. . . .

Reynolds Radio Co Denver, Colo

Rike Kumler Co., The Dayton, Ohio

Rochester Times Union Rochester. N. Y

Seeley, Stuart W East Lansing, Mich. . . .

.Service Radio Equipment Co Toledo, Ohio

Ship Owners Radio Service New York, N. Y !

Union College Schenectady. N. Y

University of Minnesota Minneapolis, Minn

University of Wisconsin Madison. Wis

W^arner Bros OaTtland. Calif

Wasmer, Louis .Seattle Wash

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co Snringfield. Mass

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co Chicago, 111

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co Newark, N. J

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co East Pittsburgh. Pa. . .

Western Radio Electric Co T,os Angeles, Calif. ...

Western Radio Co Kansas City, Mo

White & Boyer Washington, D. C

Wave

Call

lengths.

Signal

360

KZM.

360

WGL

360

KZY.

360

WCR.

360

KJS.

360

WDM.

360

WBU.

360

WHK.

360

WLW.

360

WJX.

360, 4S.5

WWJ.

360

KQV.

360

WRK.

360

WHU.

360

KLB.

360

KGC.

360

KUO.

360

WGY.

360

WCJ.

360

KJQ.

360

WLK.

360

WOH.

360

KQW.

360

KVQ.

360

WGL.

360, 485

woe.

360

KLP.

360

KQL.

360

KJR.

360

KGB.

360, 4S.';

WSZ.

360, 4S5

wou.

360

KDN.

360

KYJ.

485

WOS.

360, 4S5

WGH.

360

WPB.

360

KFC.

360, 4S5

WOZ.

360

WOK.

360

KGF.

360

KWG.

360, 485

WMH.

360

KFU.

360

WDW.

360

WDY.

360

K.I.T.

360

KYY.

360, 4S5

KIZ.

360, 485

WFO.

360, 485

WHO.

485

WHW.

360

W.IK.

360

WDT.

360

WRL.

360, 485

WLB.

360, 485

WHA.

360

KLS.

360

KHQ.

360

WBZ.

360

KYW.

360

W.IZ.

360

KDKA.

360

KOG.

360, 485

WOQ.

360

W.IH.

RADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR"

Boy Tells How To Make 'Em

By EDWIN NIELSEN

(16 years of age)

'PDWIN NIELSEN is a Chicago hoy -*-' zvho works for a big nezuspaper at night and makes receiving sets and ex- periments zvith them -when he gets a chance. His article is brief but if there are points needing more detailed explan- ation inquiries may be addressed to him in care of the Radio Age. Send self addressed and stamped envelope to Ed- zvin Nielsen, Care Radio Age, 1311 Gar- rick Building.

The Editor.

THERE are now about 80 radio sta- tions in the United States, that are sending out news reports, market re- ports, opera and musical concerts, EVERY DAY. All of this broad cast- ing may be received by ANYONE who wishes to listen to it. It can be received on outfits that are almost entirely home- made, and are so simple that they can be made by even the unskilled worker, though with a set of the kind I have in mind, the beginner must not expect to receive from any very great distances, as it will not receive messages from over 50 miles.

With receiving outfits at such a low price, there ought to be a set in every home, even if it be the simplest set that was ever devised.

A radio outfit is usually composed of an aerial system to catch the waves that are sent out by the sending station, a ground system to catch the waves that come from the ground through which they travel as well as through the air, a tuning system to allow the operator to listen to any single sending station so that he does not hear merely a jumble of sounds, a detector system which changes the radio waves to elec- tro-magnetic waves or waves which will act upon the magnets in the tele- phones and produce sounds, and in the new sets a condenser system to make the sounds clearer and louder.

A receiver that would work well es- pecially for the Radiophone concerts would be composed of: 1st, a tuning coil ; 2nd, a condenser, preferably of the Variable type ; 3rd, a crystal detec- tor ; 4th, a small fixed condenser ; and 5th, and last, a pair of receiving tele- phones.

The tuning coil is what is known as a two slide tuning coil and is made of a cardboard tube, wound with about 250 turns of No. 22 wire. The tube is then fastened to two square pieces ofr wood, which has two copper or brass rods, about one-fourth inch square, fast- ened to it. Two sliders are then made of brass bent to fit around the square rod and soldered at the place indicated in Figure 1.

TO GROUND

FIG. 4

TO AERIAL T HOW TO

, J CONNECT

THE INSTRUMENTS

VARIABLE CONDENSER^

TUNING COIL

DETECTOR.

CRYSTAL

TELEPH0NE5

FIG. 2

Figure 1 on follozving page

the rods, keeping contact with the wire, and enable the operator to tune in dif- ferent stations till the desired station is clearly heard.

In figure 1, "A," is the cardboard tube. "B" shows the round wooden discs which fit inside the tube and al- low the tube to be firmly fastened to the square blocks, "C" which holds the whole coil in an upright position so that it can be operated readily. "D" shows the method of making the slid- ers. In figure 2, the complete coil may be seen with both sliders shown, and all instruments in place.

The variable condenser can be made of a semi-circular piece of wood cut according to the directions in figure 3. There are good variable condensers

where from 3 to 65 plates. They wi improve any set, as about 60% of tl tuning is done by a variable condense A fixed condenser can be made of thrc sheets of tinfoil separated by mic sheets. The middle sheet of tinfoil mu protrude at one end of the mica ar must not come in contact with the oth( sheets of tinfoil. The whole condensi is held together with rubber bands ar wires are fastened to the protrudir edges of the tinfoil.

The detector can be made with tv binding posts, a piece of stiff wire, hai pin, or pin, and a piece of Galena cry tal. The binding posts are fastened a wood base about an inch and a ha apart, the crystal fastened to one them, the wire fastened to the otl

RADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR'

Boy Tells How To Make a Home Set

Continue d form page, fi v e

nd the point of the wii'e resting on the rystal. The instruments are then con-

I eeted as indicated in Fig. 2. The aerial can be of any one of the

I lany types! illustrated but a single ue of 14 gauge wire from 75 to 100 'et in length well insulated will work

|s good if not better than the others. ;y good insulation I mean that the

I 'ire must not touch anything except orcelain, glass, rubber or other sub- tance that will NOT conduct elec- ricity. Fig 4 shows a single wire

I erial with the insulators in place. The ,round wire must be fastened to a

I ^ater pipe or gas pipe, or any other ipe that goes beneath the surface of

I le ground.

The most important instruments now ieeded are the telephones, and as they

lannot be made, they must be bought nd as the best instruments are of little

I r no use unless the telephones are good,

would suggest that they be a good

air that you will not have to discard

I ven when you get an expensive outfit.

To operate the set after you have

verything connected you have to move

I lie sliders of the tuning coil till you et the station you Avish to hear, as )ud as you can get it, then the mov-

I ble part of the condenser is tui-ned ack and forth until the signals come

I learest.

If you do not get results, the crystal 'etector is the probable cause, and the 'ire must be made to touch the crys-

I'al in different places, in search of a ^nsitive spot where the signals can be eard. If this does not work the crys- il must be discarded and one that is lore sensitive purchased.

I

VARIABLE CONDENSER

CUT ON

DOTTED

LINES

FASTEN TINFOIL AND COVER WITH MICA

Y/IRE FASTENED TO STATIONARY PART

_KNOB AND ROD FASTENED TO MOVABLE PART

BASE

WIRE FASTENED TO M0VA3LE PART

SMALL FIXED CONDENSER

WIRES

TINFOIL

WIRES

BINDING POST

RODS

^BINDING POST

SMALL SREW5 FIXING TUBES TO DISCS B

LARGE SCREW FIXING DISCS TO BLOCKS -C

BINDING POST

END WIRE TO BINDING POST

WIRING

BEND STRIP ON DOTTED LINES

CUT ^RASS STRIP THIS SHAPE

THE HNISHED SLIDER.

SOLDER. UNDER EDGE

FIG.l

Radio on the Farm

MICA

Neither the telephone nor the auto- mobile made so great an advancement in the farmer's contact with the vil- lage and the city as the radiophone is doing. Farmer boys, quick to seize upon the radio receiving set as a scien- tific mystery that must be mastered, have brought the rural districts into close association Avith one another and with the life of the big cities. The re- sult is not onlj' entertaining but it is decidedly useful.

An eastern inventor says he will make a plow which can be directed by radio. Many of these dreams may come true but there are other developments in radio that engage the practical farmer in the practical present. For example, there is the plan of the Chi- cago Board of Trade to establish a radio system of crop and produce re- j>orts and market quotations which will be heard throiighout a radius of 500 miles from Chicago.

W. A. Wheeler, of the United States Department of Agriculture, says there is no single use of radio, except for ma- rine and aerial purposes, that should take precedence over its utilization for the benefit of agriculture.

"There are more than 32,000,000 farmers," said Mr. Wheeler, "nearly one-third of the population of the United States. Radio is the only means of getting to them quickly and at small cost. The time element in dispatching weather predictions to the farmer is a big factor. In cutting hay or harvest- ing grain an hour's delay in receiving a weather report may mean a loss of

solve the problem."

As in the city it is the boy who is leading the march toward the perfected radio age in the country. In Ocean Grove, N. J., a group of boys who were interested in radio, pooled their knowl- edge of the science and co-operated in a financial way to establish a radio receiving station, from which they send out telephone calls and messengers with the latest reports on weather, the mar- kets and the crop situation. This club, known as the Ocean County Radio Club, has become so popular that boys in other counties and other states are fol- lowing the Jersey example. This has attracted the active interest of many agricultural colleges.

The St. Louis University is broadcast- ing national and local agricultural re- ports. The United States Department of Agriculture broadcasts this service from stations at Cincinnati, Omaha, Washington, North Platte, Neb., Rock Springs, Wyo., Elko and Reno, Nevada. These are received by thousands of state bureaus, agricultural associations, banks and other interests which relay them to individual farmers.

The official weather prophet in Eng- land sends out warning of approaching thunderstorms by radio and a charge is made of six cents per message.

The Farm Bureau Federation of Chi- cago announces plans to complete its service of sending out by radio market figures, reports and activities of the American Farm Bureau, The United States Grain Growers, the Illinois Ag- ricultural Association and the National

EADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR"

How To Make A Radio Set For $6

A WIRELESS LESSON BY UNCLE SAM HIMSELF

HI

iifj OW can I make a radiophone re- J-J- ceiving outfit for a small price and listen in on the concerts, speeches; news reports, zveathcr forecasts, etc., that are broadcast each night from the sending stations nearest my home? I know very little about electricity but thousands of novices are making their own radio sets and I zvant to make one, too. I do not understand the long zvords used in most explanations. I zvant some- body to tell me in simple language, witJi clear diagrams, just hozv it can be done." One of the main objects in starting Radio Age is to answer in this first is- sue, and in all succeeding issues, the foregoing question a question asked by hundreds of thousands of boys and their daddies.

Proof that the government is impressed zvith the necessity for helping radio begin- ners is supplied in the following article. So many boys and girls in radio clubs wanted the information that the States Relations Service of the U. S. Depart- ment of Agriculture asked the U. S. Bu- reau of Standards to prepare the article for beginners. If all points are not made clear send stamped envelope zvith request for explanation and Radio Age will give you the desired information.

The Editor.

THIS article tells how to construct the entire receiving station, includ- ing antenna as well as a crystal-de- tector receiving set. This station will enable one to hear the messages sent from medium-power transmitting sta- tions within an area about the size of a large city, and to hear high-power sta- tions within 50 miles, provided the waves used by those stations have wave frequencies between 500 and 1500 kilo- cycles per second (i. e., wave lengths between 600 and 200 meters). Much greater distances are often covered, es- pecially at night. If a person constructs the coil and other parts as indicated, the total cost of this set can be kept down to about $6.00. If, however, a specially efficient outfit is desired, the cost may be about $15.00.

Essential Parts

There are five essential parts : the an- tenna, lightning switch, ground con- nections, receiving set, and phone. The received signals come into the receiv- ing set through the antenna and ground connection. In the receiving set they are converted into an electric current which produces the sound in the "phone." The phone is either one or a pair of telephone receivers worn on the head of the listener.

The purpose of the lightning switch is to protect the receiving set from dam- age by lightning. It is used to connect the antenna directly to ground when

When the antenna and the connection to the ground are properly made and the lightning switch is closed, an antenna acts as a lightning rod and is a protec- tion rather than a source of danger to the building.

The principal part of the station is the "receiving set." In the set de- scribed herein it is subdivided into two parts, the "tuner" and the "de- tector," and in more complicated sets still other elements are added. Antenna

The antenna is simply a wire sus- pended between two elevated points. Wherever there are two buildings, or a

tenna should not be less than 30 feet above the ground and its length should be about 75 ft. (See Fig. 1.) While this figure indicates a horizontal anten- na, it is not important that it be strictly horizontal. It is in fact desir- able to have the far end as high as possible. The "lead-in" wire or drop- wire from the antenna itself should run as directly as possible to the light- ning switch. If the position of the adjoining buildings or trees is such thai the distance between them is greatei than about 85 ft., the antenna can still be held to a 75 ft. distance between the insulators by increasing the length

house and a tree, or two trees with one of them very close to the house, it re- lieves one of the need of erecting one or both antenna supports. The an-

of the piece of rope (D) to which th€ far end of the antenna is attached The rope (H) tieing the antenna in- sulator to the house should not be lengthened to overcome this difficulty because by so doing the antenna "lead- in" or drop-wire (J) would be length- ened.

Details of Parts. The parts will bt mentioned here by reference to the letters appearing in Figs. 1 and 2.

A and I are screw eyes .sufficiently strong to anchor the antenna at the ends.

B and H are pieces of rope % or i/i inch in diameter, just long enough tc allow the antenna to swing clear of the two supports.

D is a piece of % or % iiich I'ope suf ficiently long to make the distance be tween E and G about 75 ft.

C is a single-block pulley which maj be used if readily available. Insulators

E and G are two insulators whicl may be constructed of any dry hare wood of sufficient strength to withstane the strain of the antenna ; blocks abou 11/2x2x10 in. will serve. The hole: should be drilled as shown in Fig. 1 suf Omilinii.e.d on vane 8, column 1

RADIO AGE— "THE MAGAZINE OF THE HOUR"

How to Make a Radio Set for $6

Continued from 2i(fff'' seven fieiently far from the ends to give proper strength. If wood is used the insulators should be boiled in paraffin for about 1 hour. If porcelain wiring cleats are available they may be substi- tuted instead of the Avood insulators. If any unglazed porcelain is used as in-

I'sulators, it should be boiled in para- ;fSn the same as the wood. Regular an- 'tenna insulators are advertised on the market, but the two improvised types

I oust mentioned will be satisfactory for an amateur receiving antenna.

P is the antenna about 75 ft. between 'the insulators E and G. The wire may 'be No. 14 or 16 copper wire either bare or insulated. The end of the antenna farthest from the receiving set may be secured to the insulator (E) by any satisfactory method, being careful not 'to kink the wire. Draw the other end

I 'of the antenna wire through the other insulator (G) to a point where the two 'insulators are separated by about 75 ft, twist the insulator (G) so as to form an anchor as shoAvn in Fig. 1. The remainder of the antenna wire (J) which now constitutes the "lead-in" or idrop-wire should be just long enough 'to reach the lightning sAvitch.

Lightning Switch

K is the lightning switch. For the purpose of a small antenna this SAvitch |may be the ordinary porcelain-base, 30 ampere, single-pole double-throAV bat-

I'tery SAvitch. These switches as ordi- narily available, have a porcelain base

|iabout 1 by 4 in. The "lead-in" Avire (J) is attached to this SAvitch at the middle point. The SAvitch blade should alAvays be thrown to the loAver clip Avhen the receiving set is not actually

..being used and to the upper clip Avhen it is desired to receive signals.

L is the ground wire for the light- ning SAvitch; it may be a piece of the same size wire as used in the antenna, Bof sufficient length to reach from the loAver clip of the lightning SAvitch (K) to the clamp on the ground rod (M). M is a piece of iron pipe or rod

I driven 3 to 6 ft. into the ground, pre- ferably Avhere the ground is moist, and

['extending a suificient distance above the ground in order that the ground

Lclamp may be fastened to it. Scrape

'I the rust or paint from the pipe before alriving in the ground.

N is a wire leading from the upper |Clip of the lightning sAvitch through the

[.porcelain tube (0) to the receiving set binding post marked "antenna."

0 is a porcelain tube of sufficient length to reach through the Avindow

['casing or wall. This tube should be

mounted in the casing or AA^all so that

it slopes doAvn toAvard the outside of

,the building. This is done to keep the

■ain from folloAAdng the tube through

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SWITCH C0NTACT5

ANTENNA

GROUND